Mrs. Arsenault's Blog!

Mrs. Arsenault's Kindergarten at Lakeland Elementary!!

Addition April 6, 2013

Filed under: Add & Subtract — Bethany Arsenault @ 4:59 am

Addition, Subtraction and Ten Frames… oh my!

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Your child will need to be able to add and subtract fluently.  Students use objects, drawings and written equations to help them solve addition/subtraction problems.  Students will use “ten frames” to help them understand how to “make ten.”  We will also be using kinesthetic activities/centers to practice our math facts.

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  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.OA.A.1 Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.

  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.OA.A.2 Solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10, e.g., by using objects or drawings to represent the problem.

  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.OA.A.3 Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).

  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.OA.A.4 For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record the answer with a drawing or equation.

  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.OA.A.5 Fluently add and subtract within 5.

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TOTALLY TERRIFIC TOOL: TEN FRAMES!

Here is a GREAT introduction to ten frames.  Watch with your child.  You may want to pause parts of it to review.

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Article about Ten Frames!

A ten frame is an amazing tool to teach a variety of math skills.

Here is an article from Oregon State University discussing the advantages of using ten frames.

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Addition & Subtraction Videos! April 5, 2013

Filed under: Add & Subtract — Bethany Arsenault @ 7:43 am

There are some really fun and catchy songs on Youtube to help our kids learn to add and subtract.  Below are some of our favorites.  Please email Mrs. Arsenault if you find any other fun ones on Youtube 🙂  Thanks!

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“I can Add” by: They Might Be Giants

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What Makes 10

This is a really fun video and the kids LOVE it!  This video includes equations that “make 10.”  They also include a series of equations with missing addens (4 + __ = 10).  I sometimes pause the video to quiz them.  I also talk to the kids about how a “ten frame” is a great tool for figuring out what that missing adden is quickly.

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Doubles Doubles!  I Can Add Doubles!

The song is great for learning those double facts.  (This version uses numbers 1-5.)

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Doubles Doubles!  I Can Add Doubles! (6-10)

This is “version 2” of the Doubles song using numbers 6-10.

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Subtract with a Pirate!

This is a cute video about subtraction.  The kids love Pirates!

 

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Add Means Put Together AND Subtract Means Take Away

 

Geometry

Filed under: Geometry — Bethany Arsenault @ 5:26 am

Geometry

pattern.blocks                        solidfigures2

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Kindergarten students need be able to name basic shapes and use position words.   Students need to understand what a 2d/3d shape is and be able to analyze describe each shape using appropriate mathematical terms.  Students will compare/contrast 2d/3d shapes and build models.  We had an awesome time creating 2d and 3d shapes out of toothpicks and marshmallows!  The Kinders did an amazing job and were able to describe their shapes using mathematical terms.

We used pattern blocks to show how you can put shapes together to make new shapes.  We learned that 6 triangles can join together to make a hexagon!   Two triangles make a rhombus and three rhombuses make a hexagon.  I was so impressed with their mathematical thinking 🙂

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  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.A.1 Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.
  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.A.2 Correctly name shapes (regardless of their orientations or overall size.)

  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.A.3 Identify shapes as two-dimensional (“flat”) or three-dimensional (“solid”).

  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.B.4 Analyze and compare 2d and 3d shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number of sides and vertices/“corners”) and other attributes (e.g., having sides of equal length).

  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.B.5 Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls) and drawing shapes.

  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.B.6 Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes. For example, “Can you join these two triangles to make a rectangle?”

 

Hundred Charts!

Filed under: Hundred Charts! — Bethany Arsenault @ 3:49 am

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A hundred chart is a great way to build number sense and help children understand how numbers are related to each other. Help your child find patterns in the chart.  When you skip-count by fives, you name all the numbers that end in 0 or 5.  When you skip-count by tens, you name all the numbers that end in a 0 and all the numbers fall in the last column of the chart. Challenge your child to skip-count in other ways and find different patterns on the chart to help them remember the skip-counting patterns.  Below is a printable version of a hundreds chart.  Have fun!

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Printable Hundreds Chart

Click chart below to print

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(Free Chart is from plantspress.blogspot.com)

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Hundred Chart Games Online

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100 Number Chart  (by ABCYA)

Help the monkey place the numbers in the hundred chart.

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Give the Dog a Bone!

Find the 1o “bones” (numbers) on the hundred chart within 60 seconds.  We love this game!  It is a great way to share our mathematical thinking.  How did you know that number was in that square, row, or column?  I love how competitive the students get with this game!

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Counting Objects

Filed under: Counting Objects — Bethany Arsenault @ 3:02 am

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Counting Objects!

Students need to be able to count a variety of objects (to 20) and match written numbers.  Students need to understand what the quantity would be when you add “one more.”

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  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.B.4 Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.
  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.B.4a When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object.
  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.B.4b Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.
  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.B.4c Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger.
  • CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.B.5 Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1–20, count out that many objects.

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Online Games that COUNT!

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Balloon Count!

Click on the balloons in order to 20!  

Home Connection: This is fun activity to do at home with buttons, pennies, or candy!  Give your child sticky notes to write numbers on.  Put the appropriate sticky note next to each item while counting.

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Missing Numbers with Curious George

Help George find the number missing from the number line   

Home Connection: This is a great game to play with any number sequence.  Play this at home using sticky notes at your own child’s level.  While some students need to focus on 11-20, many Kindergarten students are ready to move on to the twenties and beyond by this time of the school year.

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Count Objects 11-20  ~ Video

 

Counting

Filed under: Counting to 100 — Bethany Arsenault @ 3:00 am

I love to Count!  (Ahhh-ahhh-ahhh!!!)count-von-count-sesame-street

Your child needs to be able to count to 100 orally by ones and tens before the end of Kindergarten.  I also recommend that your child be able to count by fives to 100 and by twos to 30.  Transitional numbers (9, 19, 29, etc.) and skip counting can be tricky for some students.  Below are some games, songs, videos and apps that will help students practice counting and skip counting to 100 by ones, twos, fives and tens.

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CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.A.1 Count to 100 by ones and by tens.

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CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.A.2 Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence (instead of having to begin at 1).

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Problem: Tricky Transitional Numbers

This is a common issue when children are counting to 100 by 1’s.  (Examples of transitional numbers :9….10  29…30  39…40)

Here is a fun video about getting “over the hump” or in other words… getting past those tricky  transitional numbers!

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Counting Videos and Songs

Below are a couple fun videos/songs that use rhythm and exercise to help us practice counting to 100 by ones in class.  We play then every day and the kids love them!

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“I can Count to 100!”

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Let’s Get Fit! (Count to 100 by ones)

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Count by twos, fives, and tens!

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Count by 2’s

This song is VERY catchy and the kids love it 🙂

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Other Quick Ways To Practice At Home:

  • Quick Quiz: Parent says 19… child answers 20!  Parent says 29…Child answers 30!  etc.  (great for rides in the car or when waiting in line.)

  • Count by TENS using pretzel rods (each rod represents a “ten”)

  • sort cheerios into groups of tens and then count by tens to get to 100 OR put cheerios into groups of fives and count to 100

  • Make a chart to keep track of how high your child can count.  If your child is ready to move on, start at 100 & make the goal 200!

 

Counting Apps

Filed under: Counting to 100 — Bethany Arsenault @ 2:01 am

Below are a few of the apps we use to practice counting by ones, twos, fives and tens in class on our iPads!  Click on the apps’ logos to get information about the app.

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Counting Caterpillar

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This game is a class favorite! Feed the caterpillar the number aphids in the correct order. Count by ones, twos, fives, tens and counting on from a random number 0-100. Price: $1.99 and is totally worth every penny!

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100 Butterflies

Screen Shot 2013-04-05 at 1.47.16 AMStudents count by clicking the little sleeping caterpillars and turning them into pretty butterflies that fly away. Go all the way to the top of the tree through the day and night. With each click, the number is seen and pronounced all the way to 100.  Price: .99

 

 
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